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I begin with a premise: Lewis Hyde’s explantation of gift economies;

“Objects . . . will remain plentiful because they are treated as gifts.” A gift relationship with nature is a “formal give-and-take that acknowledges our participation in, and dependence upon, natural increase. We tend to respond to nature as a part of ourselves, not a stranger or alien available for exploitation. Gift exchange is the commerce of choice, for it is commerce that harmonizes with, or participates in, the process of [nature’s] increase.”   

 

How then, in a market economy, can we behave “as if” the living world were a gift, asks R. Kimmerer in Braiding Sweetgrass. “We could start by refusing to participate, a moral choice. Water is a gift for all, not meant to be bought and sold. Don’t buy it. When food has been wrenched from the earth, depleting the soil and poisoning our relatives in the name of higher yields, don’t buy it.”

 

This would seem obvious, yet its not. Many of us feel helplessly hooked onto a cycle of productivity and consumption, unable to not only rest but simply see where we are and how far/deep the consequences of our daily choices run. And this is certainly troubling (to say the least) as the “modern idea of progress, [performance, wellbeing and success] is so often a frame what is actually the destruction of the natural productivity of an ecosystem.” 

 

Why do we continue to normalize consumerism when at the brink of environmental collapse? When did we begin to separate the act of owning from the fact of taking from laborers and the land. I resonate with the ancient Vedic framework of living - one that has income and pleasure grounded within a sensitivity and responsibility to the ecological histories and futures of this world. It isn’t news that systemic oppression, brutality, disease, colonialist thinking, capitalism and an abusive stance towards the environment all coproduce one another. Escaping the city, pausing to contemplate, boycotting (social) media’s industries or setting up self-sustaining communes is not feasible for the most of us. I recognize the privilege that cushions this conversation. That being said, I have a strong feeling that most of you reading this can in fact commit to certain refusals - sustained refusals - within the scope of your current situations. And it is more important than ever that we create the will and discipline to do so. 

 

So I urge: let us not mindlessly give power to the very establishments we hope to challenge. Let us acknowledge how deeply interdependent and intertwined our individual experiences are with the far-reaching webs of loosely defined communities (human and non-human, seen and unseen) that we live amongst. Let us shift attention away from adding and towards caring, maintaining and honoring. 

 

108 Days of Resistance-in-Place is a call to more diligently deepen our connection to place: Country nestled within the city. (No, rather, Country giving life to, making place for.) To move beyond algorithms and efficiency, and into learning about our immediate neighbors, the local weeds, migration patterns, indigenous histories, tide cycles and more. To glorify the land that gives, instead of the things that we buy. To start our day in thanks, and end our day in thanks. In J. Odell’s words “when the logic of capitalist productivity threatens both endangered life and endangered ideas, I see little difference between habitat restoration in the traditional sense and restoring habits for human thought.”

For the duration of 108 days, I will document; resisting digital and urban temptations (while still living/working deep in those spaces and engaging with), attending to what needs tending to (breath, land, personal encounters), and unlearning internalized capitalist tendencies. If anything, I hope for this to serve as a gentle reminder, my hand in your hand; that we can be better.

We must be better.

 

108 Days of Resistance-in-Place

Day 1, Aug 28

Day 2, Aug 29

Day 3, Aug 30

Day 4, 5, Sept 1

Day 6, Sept 2

Day 7, Sept 3

Day 8, Sept 4

Day 9, Sept 5

Day 10, Sept 6

Day 11, Sept 7

Day 12, 13, Sept 8,9

Day 14, Sept 10

Day 15, Sept 11

Day 16, Sept 12

Day 17, Sept 13

Day 18, Sept 14

Day 19, Sept 15

Day 20, Sept 16
Day 21, Sept 17
Day 22, Sept 18
Day 23, Sept 19
Day 24, Sept 20

Day 25, Sept 21
Day 26, Sept 22

Dat 27, Sept 23

Day 28, Sept 24

Day 29, Sept 25

Day 30, Sept 26

Day 31, Sept 27

Day 32, Sept 28

Day 33, Sept 29

Day 34, Sept 30

Day 35, Oct 1

Day 36, Oct 2

Day 37, Oct 3

Day 38, Oct 4

Day 39, Oct 5

Day 40, Oct 6
Day 41, Oct 7
Day 42, Oct 8
Day 43, Oct 9

Day 44, Oct 10

Day 45, Oct 11

Day 46, Oct 12

Day 47, Oct 13

Day 48, Oct 14

Day 49, Oct 15

Day 50, Oct 16

Day 51, Oct 17

Day 52-55, Oct 18-21

Day 56, Oct 22

Day 57, Oct 23
Day 58, Oct 24

Day 59, Oct 25

Day 60, Oct 26

Day 61, Oct 27

Day 62, Oct 28

Day 63, Oct 29

Day 64, Oct 30

Day 65, Oct 31

Day 66, Nov 1

Day 67, Nov 2

Day 68, Nov 3

Day 69, Nov 4

Day 70, Nov 5

Day 71, Nov 6

Day 72, Nov 7

Day 73, Nov 8

Day 74, Nov 9

Day 75, Nov 10

Day 76, Nov 11

Day 77, Nov 12

Day 78, Nov 13

Day 79, Nov 14

Day 80, Nov 15

Day 81, Nov 16

Day 82, Nov 17

Day 83, Nov 18

Day 84, Nov 19

Day 85, Nov 20

Day 86, Nov 21

Day 87, Nov 22

Day 88, Nov 23

Day 89, Nov 24

Day 90, Nov 25

Day 91, Nov 26

Day 92, Nov 27

Day 93, Nov 28

Day 94, Nov 29

Day 95, Nov 30

Day 96, Dec 1

Day 97, Dec 2

Day 98, Dec 3

Day 99, Dec 4

Day 100, Dec 5

Day 101, Dec 6

Day 102, Dec 7

Day 103, Dec 8

Day 104, Dec 9

Day 105, Dec 10

Day 106, Dec 11

Day 107, Dec 12

Day 108, Dec 13